Passphrases are good, multi-factor authentication is better

By Nam Nguyen, Vice Chair
EHRA Privacy & Security Workgroup

October is Cybersecurity Awareness Month, and the Electronic Health Record Association (EHRA) will use this opportunity to share helpful reminders of cybersecurity fundamentals throughout the month. 

The 2020 HIMSS Cybersecurity Survey provides a look into cybersecurity issues facing US healthcare organizations.  Based upon the feedback from 168 US-based healthcare cybersecurity professionals, healthcare organizations must deal with a growing array of significant security incidents. These issues not only compromise the integrity of your technology and the privacy of patients, but can also disrupt an organization’s ability to provide patient care.

Being prepared for cyberattacks requires doing all you can to reduce cybersecurity risks. One of the most significant risks identified by security professionals is password management. Many people are still using simple passwords such as a series of numbers (123456) or easily guessed words (password). However, the easier it is to guess a password, the higher the risk of being compromised by a cyberattack. 

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Enhanced EHR Usability Starts With Understanding Users’ Needs and Challenges

By the EHRA Clinician Experience Workgroup

EHR utilization places a number of burdens on clinicians that can impact decision-making, workflow and satisfaction. This has been confirmed by recent studies, including one published earlier this year by the Journal of Biomedical Informatics which found that clinicians face numerous cognitive demands when using EHRs. The study concluded that the management of those demands ultimately limits clinicians’ agency to work individually and collaboratively while failing to help them develop awareness of, or reason about, the big picture or their patients’ current and future states, including effects of potential treatments. 

A study in Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association (JAMIA) found that when goal-based decision-making, sense-making, and agency/autonomy are overlooked in EHR design, it results in increased cognitive load, emotional distress, and unfulfilling workplace environments. And a study from Mayo Clinic and the American Medical Association (AMA) and published in Mayo Clinical Proceedings, gave EHR usability a grade of F, which is “markedly lower” than for most other technologies. Researchers further noted a strong relationship between usability and risk for physician burnout.  

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State of the Note Summit 2021 from ACP and EHRA

By EHRA Clinician Experience Workgroup

In January of this year, CMS adopted new billing guidelines from the American Medical Association (AMA) regarding E&M coding. The new guidelines include a wide variety of much-needed changes focused on streamlining billing processes and reducing clinical documentation burdens.

Seeing this as a watershed moment for clinical documentation and an opportunity to produce shorter, more clinically focused notes, the American College of Physicians (ACP) partnered with the Electronic Health Record (EHR) Association. Together, we examined the practical impacts of the coding changes with our community of vendors and clinical stakeholders, specifically:

  1. What consensus about documentation burden exists across vendors, healthcare organizations, and specialist societies when interpreting the guidelines?
  2. What questions, if any, exist around the guidelines?
  3. How can we effectively educate the community about the impact of the guidelines?
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The USCDI Curation Process: Why Stratify?

By John Travis and members of the EHRA Information Blocking Task Force 

In our last blog on the United States Core Data for Interoperability (USCDI), the focus was on USCDI as the policy ground for advancing federal interests for promoting high impact needs for health data, and USCDI’s import as a certification specification impacting developers of Certified Health Information Technology (CHIT). In this blog, we focus on how the evolution and curation of USCDI impacts the efforts of health IT developers and implementers to “stay current.” 

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The Balance Challenge for Policy in Progressing the U.S. Core Data for Interoperability (USCDI)

By John Travis and members of the EHRA Information Blocking Task Force

 

With publication of the 21st Century Cures Act: Interoperability, Information Blocking , and ONC’s Certified Health IT program final rule (Cures Act Final Rule), the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) worked to implement important provisions of the 21st Century Cures Act (Cures Act) for nationwide interoperability. The initial proposal from ONC addressing the Trusted Exchange Framework and Cooperative Agreement (TEFCA), which was also required by the Cures Act, created a central role for the U.S. Core Data for Interoperability (USCDI) in federal health IT policy, and it is important to consider what that role will be in the national policy framework. Will the USCDI push the industry beyond where it would go on its own by being progressive in its version expansion? Will it affirm and codify an extension of the current state, adhering to a principle of expansion based on supporting pre-requisites of already established interoperability standards? Or something in between?

In recent deliberations of the USCDI Task Force of the Health Information Technology Advisory Committee (HITAC), the Federal Advisory Committee established under the Cures Act, this tension point has come to light. The members of the task force seem to have two perspectives on the matter. 

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Five Ways EHRs Are Helping CDC Track COVID-19 Vaccinations

By the EHR Association COVID-19 Task Force

In December, two COVID-19 vaccines received authorization from the FDA, and the federal government began distribution to the states almost immediately. Millions of Americans have already received their first dose – many their second – and millions more will be vaccinated in the coming weeks and months. While social distancing, frequent hand washing, and face masks remain vital tools in limiting spread of coronavirus, we can increasingly see our way to a full return to hugs and handshakes, in-person meetings, travel, pubs and parties, concerts and classrooms.

As we anxiously await a return to our old way of life, public health experts, policymakers, and the public are watching the CDC vaccine data tracker, updated every evening with the latest numbers, including: 

  • How many vaccine doses have been distributed to-date? 
  • How many vaccines have been administered?
  • How many people have received their first dose? 
  • How many people have gotten a second dose?
  • Which vaccine is being administered?

But how does the CDC get all that data? The answer varies, but it’s made possible by technology, and electronic health records (EHRs) have been a key player from the beginning. 

Here are five ways that EHRs and the EHR Association are playing important roles in vaccine administration and data collection in the United States.

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