Don’t Create a Certification Ceiling

By Sasha TerMaat


Certification blog quoteAt the end of November 2017, JAMIA published the article,
“Are all certified EHRs created equal? Assessing the relationship between EHR vendor and hospital meaningful use performance.” The authors, A Jay Holmgren, Julia Adler-Milstein, and Jeffrey McCullough, performed a statistical analysis of publicly available data sets on Meaningful Use EHR Incentive Program performance, stratifying based on the developer of the EHR product used by the Meaningful Use participant.

It’s wonderful to see the data sets published by CMS and ONC used for insightful research. I know from personal experience doing data analysis of CMS and ONC published data sets that a lot of effort goes into data normalization, and the authors took a thoughtful and careful approach.

However, I was surprised by the authors’ conclusions and policy recommendations at the close of the article. Having found EHR developer-correlated variability in performance on certain activities measured in the Meaningful Use incentive program, the authors state that is undesirable, and write recommendations to standardize. The authors say, “Our results suggest that policy-makers should pursue modifications to the EHR certification process to decrease such variation across EHR vendors and improve EHR systems.” (more…)

EHRA Responds to ONC’s Interoperability Roadmap

After many conference calls, and lots of “on the job training” using Google Docs to manage the edits of many contributors, we were pleased to submit our response to ONC’s Interoperability Roadmap. . . just in time to start working on the interoperability aspects of the proposed rule for Stage 3 of the EHR Incentive Program . . .and to get ready for HIMSS15!

Overall, we’re positive about the framework the draft Roadmap is starting to put in place, its identified principles, and the pragmatic review of well-established and emerging interoperability standards and technologies. We did express some concern that ONC seems to view the many active, and increasingly successful, interoperability initiatives as a problem to be solved rather than work to inform go-forward strategies with valuable experiences to be built upon. In doing so, we provided some positive suggestions on how to approach interoperability governance in ways that rely on and leverage private sector efforts in the context of an effective public/private partnership.

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